UNITED NATIONS, NEW YORK CITY

Use your voice to create change
where change is necessary.

March 8, 2019 STARTING AT 8.30 AM

Guest Post: Use Your Intuition When You Speak Up

February 22, 2016
LAURA_DAY_300.jpg

Guest Post from Laura Day, Panelist, How to Speak Up & What’s Holding You Back Panel at the Speak Up Women Conference

When I set to work predicting the future for a company, I am rarely introduced as a psychic.  And when I’m giving a client information, I never say, “I have an intuition that … ”

This is not because intuition isn’t accepted. It’s really because I am a woman.

Laura Day

41QJvKahZkL._SX384_BO1,204,203,200_ 51rggSV0xnL._SX332_BO1,204,203,200_  81TZ-LkLJvL

 

Let me explain.

 

Whereas men are assumed to be logical, women have struggled with how to express their most brilliant and accurate intuitive knowing without sounding illogical, irresponsible, or emotional. Because we fear being perceived that way, we hold ourselves back from presenting our best ideas in a timely and convincing fashion.

We live in a world that values data, and yet most innovative ideas and intelligent detours are prescient — and therefore made before the proof is available. They are “gut” decisions,” intuitive” ones. When decisions are based only on pre-existing information, they are rarely exceptional or creative. They tend to get you to the usual place, the usual way. History is not destiny. If it were, we would all be stock market billionaires!

The female brain is physiologically structured to allow more communication between its hemispheres than men have.  It is, in fact, more able to take in and consider all kinds of data. In other words, for us, the left brain knows what the right brain is doing! Many women have not, however, been able to translate this potential advantage into a language that helps us empower ourselves and motivate others to act.

How many times have you found yourself in a compromising situation because you ignored your own voice? How often have you allowed others to take credit for your great ideas because you didn’t feel confident about airing them? How often have you been unable to make someone understand and embrace your correct point of view?

Our brain structure gives women an intellectual flexibility that allows us to evolve our beliefs when new information is presented.  However, we need to be attuned to those times when flexibility crosses the line into doubt.  We take in many sides, some of them conflicting, and we need to learn how to pick and present a right choice with certainty.

 

Here are some simple ways that you can use your unique female brain and intuition to get your ideas heard:

 

A) Dialogue with your impressions. If you feel something is off, converse with that feeling until you can pinpoint and identify something tangible to express.

 

B) Document and date-stamp your impressions and the actions that you believe they merit. Follow up by proving or disproving your ideas. Note how often your prescient ideas were correct. Not only does this allow you to feel more secure about your “gut feelings,” but you will also have the statistics to back them up!

 

C) Note every time you change your point of view merely to accommodate someone else’s take on a situation. Once again, document and date-stamp what you observe (emailing yourself is a good way of doing this) and refer to it later, when the outcome becomes clear.

 

D) Practice presenting points of view that you cannot immediately back up with numbers or historical facts. Don’t use terms like “I feel” or “I believe” when you are proposing an idea for which there is not yet hard proof. Pose a question instead. “What if we marketed our product to utilities instead of directly to the consumer?” You will notice that when you take a position, you can often — with a bit of research — locate the facts to support it. Keep track of your “hits” — the predictions that turn out to be true — both for yourself and as proof, should it be needed, of the effectiveness of your approach.

 

E) Own up to your mistakes and detail for yourself where you took a wrong turn in your thinking/intuition. You will train yourself to “target” the intuitive information you are looking for, express it more methodically, and troubleshoot your process the next time.

If you do these simple exercises and document and verify your own intuition, especially the accuracy of your predictions, you will find a new confidence and a language to express your intuition clearly.

Everyone who stands out as a leader in any area is someone who is using and expressing her intuition effectively. She sees what is coming and gives voice to her vision with authority and clarity.

This can be you!
I look forward to meeting you at the Speak Up Women Conference on March 5th at the United Nations and hearing about your experience!

 

Join the woman 20/20 calls, “The Psychic of Wall Street”, author Laura Day, for this illuminating discussion on how to awaken your intuition and breakthrough what’s holding you back!

New York Times Bestselling author Laura Day has spent nearly three decades helping individuals, organizations, and companies use their innate intuitive abilities to create profound change. Newsweek Magazine calls her “The $10,000-a-Month Psychic” because “When business people need a crystal ball, they turn to consultant Laura Day, the ‘intuitionist’.” The Independent dubbed her “The Psychic of Wall Street”. “A” List Hollywood Stars and Wall Street executives all praise her abilities to hone in on future predictions with astounding accuracy including the last recession.

Laura’s work has helped demystify intuition and bring it into the mainstream, she demonstrate its practical, verifiable uses in the fields of business, science, medicine and personal growth. She has trained thousands of people to use their brains, perceptions and “sixth sense” in effective ways to realize their goals.

Day is the New York Times bestselling author of 6 books including, Practical Intuition, How to Rule the World from Your Couch and The Circle: How the Power of a Single Wish Can Change Your Life. Read about Laura in Newsweek, Om Times and 20/20, and watch her interview excerpts.